A conceptual critique of Prevent: Can Prevent be saved? No, but…

Dr Joshua Skoczylis, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Social and Political Sciences Mr Sam Andrews, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Social and Political Sciences

 

 

 

 

 

The UK’s Prevent policy continues to fail in its fundamental purpose to prevent extremism and has at times even created spaces where extremism flourishes. This article goes beyond the mechanism of implementation providing a conceptual understanding of how Prevent maintains the neoliberal status quo. The promotion of the neoliberal status quo, depoliticisation and a lack of focus on root causes continue to undermine Prevent. Any policy aimed at preventing extremism and terrorism must be well integrated into the government’s wider social policies, shifting away from securitisation and towards improving society. Reducing extremism becomes a by-product of a much broader attempt at changing society, focusing on policies that address racism, gender and socio-economic inequality. These policies, we argue, must encourage political engagement with all groups, especially marginalised ones. Creating a healthier democracy will reduce risks of extremism and will negate the need for a Prevent policy based on discrimination and securitisation.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Joshua Skoczylis, University of Lincoln, School of Social and Political Sciences

Sam Andrews, University of Lincoln, School of Social and Political Sciences


 

CaHRU PhD student Laura Simmons wins Best Presentation Award at the Postgraduate Research Showcase 2019

 Community and Health Research Unit, CaHRU

CaHRU and Lincoln Institute for Health PhD student Laura Simmons presented and won an award for her research into understanding sickness absence in the ambulance service at the annual Postgraduate Research Showcase 2019 on 20th February 2019.

The conference was hosted by the Doctoral School at the University of Lincoln and provided postgraduate researchers an opportunity to showcase their research to other staff and students at the university.

Keynote speakers included Dr Roger Bretherton who provided a talk on character strengths of a researcher. This was following by an afternoon key note by Julie Bayley, who delivered a session on research impact and your career. PhD students Charlotte Cartledge and Lauren Mumby finished the day by providing some tops of surviving your PhD from a student perspective.

Prizes were awarded for Supervisor of the Year (Dr Roger Bretherton) and Student of the Year (Lilian Korir) followed by Best Presentation and Best Poster (Amber Smith). Laura was awarded Best Presentation for her session in the category of Health and Care along with Nadia Maalin (Psychology), Nicola Chanamuto (Social and Political Sciences), May Omoigberale (Life Sciences), Katie Gibbs (Psychology), Josephine Westlake (Geography) and Lisa Jacobs (Computer Science).

Lincoln Psychologist Discusses Research on Crimewatch

CoSS UoL research, Facial Recognition, BBC Kay Ritchie, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology

Dr Kay Ritchie from the College of Social Science has appeared on BBC’s Crimewatch Roadshow to discuss her work on improving CCTV images using face averages.

Dr Ritchie led a study with psychologists from the University of Lincoln and York, UK, and the University of New South Wales in Australia to create a series of pictures using a ‘face averaging’ technique – a method which digitally combines multiple images into a single enhanced image, removing variants such as head angles or lighting so that only features that indicate the identity if the person remain.

They compared how effectively humans and computer facial recognition systems could identify high quality images, pixelated images, and face averages. The results showed that both people and computer systems were better at identifying a face when viewing an average image that combined multiple pixelated images, compared to the original poor-quality images. Computer systems benefited from averaging together multiple images that were already high in quality, and in some cases reached 100 per cent accurate face recognition.   The results have implications for law enforcement and security agencies, where low quality, pixelated images are often the only pictures of suspects available to use in investigations. The image averaging method offers a standardised way of using images captured from multiple CCTV cameras to create a digital snapshot which can be better recognised by both people and computer software systems.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Kay Ritchie, Universtiy of Lincoln, School of Psychology


 

How do mentally tough athletes overcome self-directed anger, shame, and criticism? A self-forgiveness mediation analysis

Dr Lee Crust, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Sport and Exercise Science, UoL CoSS researchDr Trish Jackman, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Sport and Exercise Science, UoL CoSS research

 

 

 

 

 

In this study, we examined associations among mental toughness, negative emotions and cognition, and self-forgiveness. A sample of 343 competitive tennis players (Mage = 17.56, SD = 2.37) completed questionnaires measuring their tendency to experience shame, anger, and criticism towards themselves, along with mental toughness and self-forgivingness. Mental toughness correlated negatively with self-oriented shame, anger, and criticism, and positively with self-forgivingness. The effect of mental toughness on both shame and anger towards the self was fully mediated by self-forgiveness, whereas self-forgiveness partially mediated the effect for self-criticism. The findings support the role of self-forgiveness as a mediator in reducing or eliminating self-condemning, resentful, and devaluing responses that athletes direct towards themselves. Developers of mental toughness interventions might consider incorporating a self-forgiveness component to help athletes who make mistakes, underperform, or experience defeats.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Lee Crust, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Dr Trish Jackman, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science


 

Copenhagen Consensus: physical activity & ageing

Health Advancement Research Team, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, Sport and Exercise Science UoL CoSS HART

HART researchers, Joanna Blackwell and Adam Evans, together with international colleagues representing nine countries and a variety of academic disciplines met in Snekkersten, Denmark, to reach evidence-based consensus about physical activity and older adults. It was recognised that the term ‘older adults’ represents a highly heterogeneous population, encompassing those who remain highly active and healthy throughout the life-course to the very old, and oldest-old and frail. The consensus statement is drawn from a wide range of research methodologies within epidemiology, medicine, physiology, neuroscience, psychology and sociology, recognising the strength and limitations of each. The statement distinguishes between physical activity and exercise, and presents the consensus on the effects of physical activity on older adults’ fitness, health, cognitive functioning, functional capacity, engagement, motivation, psychological well-being and social inclusion. It also covers the consensus on physical activity implementation strategies. The statement is available on open access here.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Jens Bangsbo, Department of Nutrition Exercise and SportsUniversity of Copenhagen

Joanna Blackwell, School of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Lincoln,  and Department of Nutrition Exercise and SportsUniversity of Copenhagen

Carl-Johan Boraxbekk, DRCMRUniversity of Copenhagen

Paolo Caserotti, Department of Sports Science and Clinical BiomechanicsSyddansk Universitet

Flemming Dela, Department of Biomedical SciencesUniversity of Copenhagen

Adam Evans, Department of Nutrition Exercise and SportsUniversity of Copenhagen

Astrid Pernille Jespersen, Copenhagen Centre for Health Research in the HumanitiesUniversity of Copenhagen

Lasse Gliemann, Department of Nutrition Exercise and SportsUniversity of Copenhagen

Arthur Kramer, Center for Cognitive and Brain HealthNortheastern University

Jesper Lundbye-Jensen, Department of Nutrition Exercise and SportsUniversity of Copenhagen

Erik Lykke Mortense, Department of Public HealthUniversity of Copenhagen

Aske Juul Lassen, Copenhagen Centre for Health Research in the HumanitiesUniversity of Copenhagen

Alan Gow, Department of PsychologyHeriot-Watt University and Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh

Stephen Harridge, Centre for Human and Applied Physiological SciencesKing’s College London

Ylva Hellsten, Department of Nutrition Exercise and SportsUniversity of Copenhagen

Michael Kjaer, Department of Biomedical SciencesUniversity of Copenhagen and Department of Geriatrics, Bispebjerg-Frederiksberg Hospital, Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen

Urho Kujala, Faculty of Sport and Health SciencesUniversity of Jyväskylä

Ryan Rhodes, School of Exercise Science, Physical & Health EducationUniversity of Victoria

Elizabeth Pike, Department of Psychology and Sport SciencesUniversity of Hertfordshire

Timothy Skinner, Department of PsychologyKobenhavns Universitet

Thomas Skovgaard, Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Faculty of Health SciencesUniversity of Southern Denmark

Jens Troelsen, Department of Sports Science and Clinical BiomechanicsSyddansk Universitet

Emmanuelle Tulle, Glasgow School for Business and SocietyGlasgow Caledonian University

Mark Tully, School of Health SciencesUniversity of Ulster

Jannique van Uffelen, Department of Movement SciencesKU Leuven

Jose Viña, Department of PhysiologyUniversitat de Valencia


 

Improving Healthcare for People in Contact with Probation

Dr Coral Sirdifield, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Health and Social Care, UoL CoSS CaHRU

Prof Niro Siriwardena, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Health and Social Care, Director of Community and Health Research Unit, UoL CoSS research CaHRU

 

 

 

 

The key to improving healthcare for people in contact with probation lies in four main areas: commissioning, policy, practice, and
research.

We have created a toolkit for healthcare commissioners which includes:
Information on the likely health needs of people in contact with probation
An overview of the roles and responsibilities of different organisations
Potential models of good practice to pilot recommendations for each of the areas key areas for improvement listed above.
This is freely available from probhct.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Coral Sirdifield, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care
Dr Rebecca Marples,  University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care
Professor Charlie Brooker, Royal Holloway, University of London
Professor David Denney, Royal Holloway, University of London
Professor Niroshan Siriwardena, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care
Mr Dean Maxwell-Harrison, Service User Consultant
Ms Sophie Strachan, Service User Consultant
Mr Tony Connell, Probation Representative


 

 

Should GPs routinely screen for gambling disorders?

Dr Amanda Roberts, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology, UoL CoSS research

Gambling was reclassified from an impulse control disorder to a behavioural addiction in the DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edn).1 Conservative estimates indicate that approximately 1% of the UK population exhibit gambling behaviour that warrants a diagnosis of ‘disordered gambling’,2 where disordered gambling refers to the useful term proposed in the DSM-52 re-classification encompassing ‘problem’, ‘pathological’, and ‘compulsive’ gambling.1 The negative effects of disordered gambling can include mental health problems, financial crises, relationship breakdown, domestic violence, and self-harm or suicide, and tend to cluster with other high-risk behaviours such as smoking and drug taking.


University of Lincoln, College of Social science Research

Dr Amanda Roberts, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Henrietta Bowden-Jones, National Problem Gambling Clinic, London and Imperial College London

David Roberts, Market Square Surgery, Waltham Abbey

Stephen Sharman, University of East London


 

Scientific heirlooms awarded to leading female scientists & engineers on International Women’s Day

Prof Kerstin Meints, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology, UoL CoSS research

As Suffrage Women in Science Award holder, Kerstin was invited to this year’s Science Award ceremony at the Royal Society in London on March 8, 2019. The Suffrage Science scheme was founded by the Medical Research Council’s London Institute of Medical Sciences. It celebrates and inspires women in science, creating a self-perpetuating cohort of talent that will encourage others to enter science and reach senior leadership roles.

Kerstin nominated Prof. Tiny De Keuster University of Ghent, Belgium, to receive the next Women in Science Award and has handed on the heirloom to her. The heirloom will be kept for 2 years and then move on to the next recipient.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Prof Kerstin Meints, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Prof Tiny De Keuster, University of Ghent