Systematic Review Seminar

Dr Ffion Curtis, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, Lincoln Institute for Health UoL CoSS LiH research Dr Arwel Jones, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, Lincoln Institute for Health UoL CoSS LiH research

 

 

 

 

This workshop provides you with an introduction on how to source and review research within your own fields and practice. This could be valuable to your organisation in that it could ensure new projects and interventions are grounded in the most up to date knowledge and research. This session will be led by Arwel Jones and Ffion Curtis from the Lincoln Institute of Health

This taster session is aimed at clinicians, managers, service delivery staff and anyone with an interest in improving service delivery through research. No previous research experience is required but an interest in such things as service improvement, evaluation and policy development would be advantageous.

For further enquiries, please email: cossres@lincoln.ac.uk


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Training

Dr Arwel Jones, University of Lincoln, Lincoln Institute for Health

Dr Ffion Curtis, University of Lincoln, Lincoln Institute for Health


 

 

 

 

 

The effect of ANKK1 Taq1A and DRD2 C957T polymorphisms on executive function: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Dr Ffion Curtis, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, Lincoln Institute for Health UoL CoSS LiH researchDr Kyla Pennington, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology, UoL CoSS research

 

 

 

 

Research in healthy adults suggests that C957T polymorphism of the dopamine D2 receptor encoding DRD2 and the Taq1A polymorphism of the neighbouring gene ankyrin repeat and kinase domain containing 1 (ANKK1) alter dopaminergic signalling and may influence prefrontally-mediated executive functions. A systematic review and meta-analysis was carried out on the evidence for the association of DRD2 C957T and ANKK1 Taq1A polymorphisms in performance on tasks relating to the three core domains of executive function: working memory, response inhibition and cognitive flexibility in healthy adults. CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycARTICLES and PsychINFO databases were searched for predefined key search terms associated with the two polymorphisms and executive function. Studies were included if they investigated a healthy adult population with the mean age of 18–65 years, no psychiatric or neurological disorder and only the healthy adult arm were included in studies with any case-control design. Data from 17 independent studies were included in meta-analysis, separated by the Taq1A and C957T polymorphisms and by executive function tests: working memory (Taq1A, 6 samples, n = 1270; C957 T, 6 samples, n = 977), cognitive flexibility (C957 T, 3 samples, n = 620), and response inhibition (C957 T, 3 samples, n = 598). The meta-analyses did not establish significant associations between these gene polymorphisms of interest and any of the executive function domains. Theoretical implications and methodological considerations of these findings are discussed.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Kristel Klaus, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Kevin Butler, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Dr Ffion Curtis, University of Lincoln, Lincoln Institute for Health

Chris Bridle, University of Lincoln, Lincoln Institute for Health

Dr Kyla Pennington, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology


 

Sociobehavioral and community predictors of unsuppressed HIV viral load: multilevel results from a hyperendemic rural South African population

Extensive antiretroviral therapy scale-up is expected to prevent onward transmission of HIV by reducing the overall community viral load. Despite multiple studies about predictors of detectable viral load derived from clinical setting, to date, no study has established such predictors using a population-based viral load survey in a sub-Saharan African hyperendemic setting to inform interventions designed to halt HIV transmission. We used one of Africa’s largest prospective cohorts in rural KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa, to establish the key sociodemographic, behavioral and community predictors of unsuppressed viral load at the population level.

 


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science

Andrew Tomita, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Alain Vandormael, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Till Bärnighausen, University of Heidelberg

Andrew Phillips, University College London

Deenan Pillay, University College London

Tulio De Oliveira, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Frank Tanser, University of Lincoln