A Guardian of Universal Interest or Increasingly Out of its Depth?

Prof Duncan French, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, Lincoln Law School

In contemporary debates on the authority of global institutions, there is an important yet often overlooked organisational curiosity: namely, the International Seabed Authority (‘ISA’). The ISA reflects a highpoint in international communitarian governance. Premised around traditional notions of access, control and allocation of deep seabed resources, its mandate is both invariably spatial-temporal, and yet also limited and functional. Its purpose is to govern the extraction of seabed mineral resources for the collective benefit of the international community. To achieve that ambition, however, a highly complex and bureaucratic regulatory structure has been established. In this paper we aim to consider this tension in the mandate of the ISA, particularly insofar as it manifests in aspects of its institutional design and functioning in practice. Recognising these dynamics not only helps one better understand governance of the deep seabed, but also broadly demonstrates the innate tensions in granting institutional control over common spaces.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Richard Collins, University College Dublin

Duncan French, University of Lincoln


Community Health Trainers in the UK – identity, identity work and boundary work

This article contributes empirical findings and sociological theoretical perspectives to discussions of the role of community lay health workers, including in improving the health of individuals and communities. We focus on the role of the Health Trainer (HT), at its inception described as one of the most innovative developments in UK Public Health policy.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science;

Rachel Williams, Community Lincs, UK;

Geoff Middleton, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science;

Hannah Henderson, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science;

Lee Crust, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science;

Adam Evans, University of Copenhagen.


 

Predictors of Dropout in Disordered Gamblers in UK Residential Treatment Authors

Dr Amanda Roberts, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology, UoL CoSS research

Within the cohort of individuals who seek treatment for disordered gambling, over half fail to complete treatment. The current study sought to identify predictors of treatment dropout in a sample of gamblers attending a residential treatment facility for disordered gamblers in the UK and to report differences in voluntary and enforced dropout. Data on 658 gamblers seeking residential treatment with the Gordon Moody Association (GMA) was analysed, collected between 2000 and 2015. Measurements included demographic data, self-reported gambling behavior, (including the Problem Gambling Severity Index), mental and physical health status, and a risk assessment. Binary logistic regression models were used to examine predictors of treatment termination. Results confirm a high percentage of treatment dropout among disordered gamblers (51.3%). Significant predictors of treatment dropout included older age of the client, higher levels of education, higher levels of debt, online gambling, gambling on poker, shorter duration of treatment, higher depression, experience of previous treatment programmes and medication, and adverse childhood experiences. Within non-completers, significant predictors of enforced dropout included lifetime homelessness, less debt, sports gambling, depression and lifetime smoking. Those who were on a longer treatment programme and had previously received gambling treatment or support were less likely to be asked to leave. Clinicians working in inpatient support need to be aware of the increased psychopathogical and psychosocial problems in those who are at risk of termination and make attempts to retain them in treatment and increase patient compliance.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Amanda Roberts, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Raegan Murphy, University College Cork, School of Applied Psychology

John Turner, University of East London, School of Psychology

Steve Sharman, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology and University of East London, School of Psychology


 

Making a Co-operative University: a new form of knowing – not public but social

Dr Joss Winn, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Social and Political Sciences

Prof Mike Neary, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, Scjool of Social and Political Sciences UoL Research CoSS

 

 

 

 

Calls to establish public education avoid the fact that public education is provided by the capitalist state whose real purpose is the market-based model of private gain. Public against private education is a false dichotomy; rather, public and private are complementary forms of capitalist regulation. Radical alternatives require a more foundational critique of the structures of capitalist education, grounded in an understanding of the contradictory relationship between capital and labour on which the institutions of capitalist civilisation are based. This article suggests a counter project: not public education but social knowing as the basis for a solidaristic form of social life. Our model for social knowing starts with the idea of a co-operative university.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science

Mike Neary, University of Lincoln, School of Social and Political Sciences

Joss Winn, University of Lincoln, School of Education


 

Psychology Labs

The Psychology Labs in the Sarah Swift building are used by the School of Psychology for research projects in areas such as forensic psychology, perception and cognition, development and social behaviour, and autism.