Saving bones without risking brain—bisphosphonates and risk of stroke: matched case-control study

CaHRU

We investigated the association between bisphosphonate treatment and the risk of stroke using a large routine clinical dataset. We found no association between bisphosphonate treatment and risk of stroke, after adjusting for large number of clinical and demographic confounders.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science and College of Science Research

Z B Ashgar, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

A Godoy Caballero, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

S Pathirannehelage, University of Surrey

J Williams, University of Surrey

S McKay, University of Lincoln, School of Social and Political Science

P Grassby, University of Lincoln, School of Pharmacy

S de Lusignan, University of Oxford

A Niro Siriwardena, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care


The Blue Dog

The Blue Dog, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, UoL CoSS

Dogs are wonderful companions and the most popular pets worldwide. Dog ownership appears to provide psychological benefits for the child, in terms of emotional, cognitive, behavioural, educational and social development.

Unfortunately, there is a downside to this relationship. Dog bites in children represent a serious health and safety issue for both families and the pet dog involved.

Pathways to educational engagement: an exploratory study of outcomes from an Australian school-based youth mentoring program

School-based mentoring (SBM) programs are seen as a way of preventing the disengagement of young people from education. However, existing research points to a complex relationship between SBM programs and improved engagement outcomes. There is therefore a need for greater understanding of the pathways through which SBM leads to outcomes for young people. This paper addresses this complexity, examining the nuanced ways in which SBM may lead to positive outcomes for young people. Drawing on the qualitative perspectives of 15 young people engaged in an Australian SBM program, the findings point to two types of pathways to outcomes. First, direct pathways go to the heart of young people’s engagement, by prioritizing educational performance and achievement as the focus of the mentoring relationship. Second, holistic pathways see mentors seeking to influence young people’s broader thinking about the value of education, their wellbeing and their communication skills, to in turn address issues that may otherwise present barriers to young people’s engagement. The paper discusses the policy implications of the findings. It highlights the importance of acknowledging and measuring incremental steps to improved educational engagement, in a context of young people experiencing non-linear and complex pathways to engagement outcomes.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Ariella Meltzer, UNSW, Centre for Social Impact

Abigail Powell, University of Lincoln

Isabella Saunders, UNSW, Centre for Social Impact

Post-Treatment and Recovery Following Cancer

Dr Ros Kane and David Nelson talk about their Macmillan funded research looking at those living with and beyond cancer

100 years of gambling machines : from the Liberty Bell to the Fixed Odds Betting Terminal

Mr Jim Rogers, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Health and Social Care, UoL CoSS Research

Fixed Odds Betting Terminals, a form of high stakes gambling machine, have been very much in the news in 2018. Parliament has been persuaded that such machines, dubbed as the ‘crack cocaine of gambling’ need tighter regulation. The debate about gambling machines is, however, not new. Coin operated machines have existed for over 2000 years, but the development of technology led to over 1000 applications to the UK patent office in the 1890s for rights on gambling machines.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Mr Jim Rogers, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care


Research Showcase: Striking Women

Dr Sundari Anitha talks about her ground-breaking research into south Asian woman and the Grunwick and Gate Gourmet industrial disputes of the 1970’s and 80’s.