Understanding facial impressions between and within identities

Dr Robin Kramer, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology, UoL CoSS research

A paradoxical finding from recent studies of face perception is that observers are error-prone and inconsistent when judging the identity of unfamiliar faces, but nevertheless reasonably consistent when judging traits. Our aim is to understand this difference. Using everyday ambient images of faces, we show that visual image statistics can predict observers’ consensual impressions of trustworthiness, attractiveness and dominance, which represent key dimensions of evaluation in leading theoretical accounts of trait judgement. In Study 1, image statistics derived from ambient images of multiple face identities were able to account for 51% of the variance in consensual impressions of entirely novel ambient images. Shape properties were more effective predictors than surface properties, but a combination of both achieved the best results. In Study 2 and Study 3, statistics derived from multiple images of a particular face achieved the best generalisation to new images of that face, but there was nonetheless significant generalisation between images of the faces of different individuals. Hence, whereas idiosyncratic variability across different images of the same face is sufficient to cause substantial problems in judging the identities of unfamiliar faces, there are consistencies between faces which are sufficient to support (to some extent) consensual trait judgements. Furthermore, much of this consistency can be captured in simple operational models based on image statistics.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Robin Kramer, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Mila Mileva, University of York, Department of Psychology

Andrew Young, University of York, Department of Psychology

Mike Burton, University of York, Department of Psychology


 

Qualitative Secondary Analysis: Building Longitudinal Samples to Understand Men’s Generational Identities in Low Income Contexts

Dr Anna Tarrant, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Social and Political Science UoL CoSS research S&PS

There have been significant developments in methods of qualitative secondary analysis (QSA), prompted in part by growth in infrastructure for archiving and sharing qualitative data, facilitating reuse. Building from these developments, this article presents QSA that brings together subsamples of men in low income contexts from two qualitative longitudinal datasets produced under Timescapes, demonstrating the complex linkages between them, and addressing two key questions. First, in bringing these two datasets together, is it possible to build an intergenerational sample of men in low income contexts to further our understanding of their generational identities and intergenerational experiences? Second, what sorts of intergenerational, or intragenerational, analyses are possible? We conclude that it was not possible to build a straightforwardly vertical intergenerational sample, but intragenerational cohort analyses of generational identities have enabled insights into the dynamic relational processes productive of longitudinal experiences of marginalization and vulnerability for men living in low income contexts.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Anna Tarrant, University of Lincoln, School of Social and Political Science

Kahryn Hughes, University of Leeds


 

In the field with two rural primary school head teachers in England

The research focuses on the complexities associated with contemporary rural primary school leadership. The paper draws on in-depth ethnographic research undertaken in two contrasting English rural primary schools and their surrounding community over a period of three years and in particular the experiences and perspectives of the two head teachers from these schools. The paper is conceptually informed by the work of Bourdieu [1984. Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul] and his work around field, habitus and capital as a means of understanding practice. The paper contends that as the neo-liberal economic field increasingly contaminates the field of schooling so a contextual understanding of the complex and shifting social space which a head teacher occupies, including their habitus and the capital they deploy, is of central importance to understanding practice.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Carl Bagley, Queen’s University Belfast, School of Social Sciences

Sam Hillyard, University of Lincoln, School of Social and Political Sciences


 

Pint of Science

On May 20th-22nd 2019 University of Lincoln staff and students took their research to the pubs of Lincoln as Pint of Science came to the city for the first time. 18 talks were given by 20 researchers across 3 evenings in 3 venues, welcoming members of the public to explore the discoveries of University of Lincoln scientists, with audiences describing the experience as a:
“Fantastic opportunity to reach a wider audience at a relaxed and enjoyable event.”

HART PhD Student Presents at the International Sociology of Sport Association

Health Advancement Research Team, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, Sport and Exercise Science UoL CoSS HART

HART PhD student, Gareth McNarry, who is undertaking a dual doctorate with the University of Lincoln and the University of Copenhagen (supervised by Dr Adam Evans, Copenhagen, and Prof Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson, Lincoln), recently presented his research on the lived experience of competitive swimmers at the International Sociology of Sport Association, World Congress of Sport 2019, held at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. Gareth’s talk focused on salient preliminary findings from his PhD, cohering around two key themes. The first, ‘Becoming and Remaining’, focused on how the swimmers initially engaged with the aquatic lifeworld and their motivations for remaining. The second, ‘Doing’, analysed the ways in which the swimmers are actively engaged in a process of mindful swimming that highlights the mind-body-world linkage.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Mr Gareth McNarry, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science and University of Copenhagen

Prof Jaceuelyn Allen-Collinson, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Adam Evans, University of Copenhagen


 

Amanda Roberts Recieves Funding For Gambling Conference

Dr Amanda Roberts, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology, UoL CoSS research

Amanda Roberts has received funding form the Society from the Study of Addictions (SSA) to host the first Current Advances in Gambling Research (GAGR) on 12th July 2019 alongside colleagues from UEL.  The conference will be held at University Square Stratford, University of East London and is free to attend.  Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

Current Advances in Gambling Research (2019): Gambling Research in the UK

Fri, 12 July 2019, 09:30 – 16:00 BST

University of East London, Water Lane, London E15 4LZ

The conference aims to bring together inter-disciplinary academic experts in a range of gambling fields, including (but not limited to) behaviour, addiction, clinical treatment services, economics, and neuroscience to discuss the latest data driven developments in research on gambling in a supportive and critically reflective environment. We aim to showcase some of the excellent gambling research being done in the UK, and provide a networking opportunity for researchers. Although primarily a research driven academic conference, attendance is open to everyone.

Up to 8 further presentation slots (15 minutes each) are also available. If you are interested in presenting your research at this conference, please submit an abstract via the following link (max 1750 characters):

The deadline for abstract submission is MONDAY 13th MAY. Successful submissions will be notified by Friday 17th May.

The deadline for conference registration is MONDAY 24th JUNE.

 

Psychosocial correlates in treatment seeking gamblers: Differences in early age onset gamblers vs later age onset gamblers

Dr Amanda Roberts, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology, UoL CoSS research

 

Age of onset is an important factor in the development and trajectory of psychiatric disorders; however, little is known regarding the age of onset in relation to disordered gambling in treatment seeking samples in the UK. Utilising a large residential treatment seeking gambler cohort, the current study examined the relationship between age of gambling onset and a range of variables thought to be associated with disordered gambling.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Steve Sharman, University of East London, School of Psychology

Raegan Murphy, University College Cork, School of Applied Psychology

John Turner, University of East London, School of Psychology

Amanda Roberts, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology


Environmental Human Rights

Dr Stephen Turner talks about the Standards in Environmental Rights Project.

Primary Care for Sleep and Insomnia Problems

Prof Niro S talks about his groundbreaking research into GP referrals and patients with insomnia.