NeighbourHood Teams and The Lincolnshire STP

Beckie McConville  and Victoria Sleight who are Leads for the Neighbourhood Teams in Lincolnshire are coming in to talk about their work and the STP. Since the Lincolnshire Sustainability and Transformation Plan was published, a number of projects have delivered great results. The STP are committed to improving the quality of health and care services provided in Lincolnshire and boosting health and wellbeing for all of their residents. Last year, they opened a new, bespoke, ten bed male psychiatric unit in Lincoln, offering intensive treatment. This means that since July 2017 patients have not needed to travel outside of the county for inpatient care; a much better patient journey.

For further enquiries, please contact cossres@lincoln.ac.uk.

High-altitude Mountaineering Multi-disciplinary Research

Health Advancement Research Team, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, Sport and Exercise Science UoL CoSS HART

In recent years, members of MTOUGH and HART have been working in an exciting research collaboration in a multi-disciplinary and phenomenologically-oriented series of research projects on high-altitude mountaineering, involving in-depth interviews with élite mountaineers across the globe. From a sport psychology perspective, and led by Dr Lee Crust and Dr Christian Swann, we have published articles on mental toughness in relation to: decision-making, responses to mountaineering disasters such as avalanches and an earthquake, and behaviours whilst on expedition. Most recent work has involved focusing our analytic attention on the sociological-phenomenological lifeworld of high-altitude mountaineers, from which we have published two sociological articles on embodiment, led by Professor Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson, on: 1) endurance and ‘endurance work’ (published in Sociology); and 2) the sensory dimension of lived weather and ‘weather work’ (in Body & Society). A free authors’ version of the article on endurance can be found in the University repository here.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Prof Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Dr Lee Crust, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Dr Christian Swann, Southern Cross University


Suboptimal Nocturnal Glucose Control Is Associated With Large for Gestational Age in Treated Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Prof Graham Law, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, SChool of Health and Social Care, UoL CoSS Research

We performed a prospective observational study of 162 pregnant women with GDM in specialist multidisciplinary antenatal diabetes clinics. Participants undertook 7-day masked CGM at 30–32 weeks’ gestation. Standard summary indices and glycemic variability measures of CGM were calculated. Functional data analysis was applied to determine differences in temporal glucose profiles. LGA was defined as birth weight ≥90th percentile adjusted for infant sex, gestational age, maternal BMI, ethnicity, and parity.


 

University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Prof Graham Law, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Alia Alnaji, Division of Clinical and Population Sciences, Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine, University of Leeds

Lina Alrefail, Division of Clinical and Population Sciences, Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine, University of Leeds

Del Endersby, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust

Sarah Cartland, Division of Clinical and Population Sciences, Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine, University of Leeds and Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust

Stephen Gilbey, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trusr

Paul Jennings, York NHS Foundation Trust

Helen Murphy, Division of Maternal Health, St Thomas’ Hospital, King’s College London

Eleanor Scott, Division of Clinical and Population Sciences, Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine, University of Leeds and Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust


 

Feasibility and development of a cariogenic diet scale for epidemiological research

Background

Diet cariogenicity plays a major role as both a protective and risk factor in the development of early childhood caries (ECC).

Aim

Develop a scale measuring the cariogenicity of foods and beverages and employ it to describe the cariogenicity of young children’s diets and predict dental caries outcomes.

Design

Scores of cariogenicity and consumption frequency were applied to food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) collected from an Australian children’s cohort study with three time‐points of data. One‐way ANOVA, with post hoc Tukey test compared mean cariogenic scale measured at 18 months between the subsample of children with caries classification at age 5 years.

Results

At 6 months, children’s mean cariogenic score was 10.05, increasing to 34.18 at 12 and 50.00 at 18 months. Mean cariogenic scale score at 18 months was significantly higher in children with advanced disease at 5 years (mean scale score: 59.0 ± 15.9) compared to those that were healthy (mean score 47.7 ± 17.5, P = 0.007) or had mild‐moderate disease (mean score 48.2 ± 17.3, P = 0.008).

Conclusions

The cariogenic diet scale provides a useful indication of the increasing cariogenicity of children’s diets with age and highlights the incorporation of discretionary choice foods and beverages into the diets of young children much earlier than nutritionally recommended.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research
Emily Amezdroz
Lauren Carpenter
Shae Johnson
Victoria Flood
Stuart G. Dashper
Hanny Calache
Mark Gussy

Elizabeth Waters