Professor Steve McKay’s Research Featured in New Report Published by the Nuffield Foundation

Prof Steve McKay, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Social and Political Sciences

Professor Steve McKay from the School of Social and Political Sciences has had research featured in a new report by the Nuffield Foundation, which examines ways to improve how data on family separation is collected and analysed.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Prof Steve McKay, University of Lincoln, School of Social and Political Science


 

HART Bingocize® research visit

Health Advancement Research Team, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research, School of Sport and Exercise Science

HART and the School of Sport & Exercise Science were delighted recently to welcome to the Human Performance Centre Dr Matthew Shake, Associate Professor of Psychological Sciences in the Ogden College of Science and Engineering, West Kentucky University (WKU). Matthew’s research focuses on cognitive changes in older adulthood, particularly aspects of executive function and language processing. His grant-funded work on Bingocize® – in collaboration with Dr K Jason Crandall of WKU, examines the benefits of a community-based exercise intervention for older adults’ cognitive abilities and psychological well-being.  Bingocize® is an evidence-based health promotion program/mobile app combining exercise, health education, and the game of bingo. HART’s Hannah Henderson, Geoff Middleton, PhD student Anna Mongan, and Georgia Clay, are currently involved in researching Bingocize® involvement in various Lincolnshire-based programmes.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Matthew Shake, West Kentucky University

Dr Jason Crandall, West Kentucky University

Dr Hannah Henderson, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Mr Geoff Middleton, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Anna Mongan, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Georgia Clay, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science


 

The visual cues that drive the self-assessment of body size: Dissociation between fixation patterns and the key areas of the body for accurate judgement

Prof Martin Tovee, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of PsychologyDr Kamila Irvine, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology

 

 

 

 

A modified version of the bubbles masking paradigm was used in three experiments to determine the key areas of the body that are used in self-estimates of body size. In this paradigm, parts of the stimuli are revealed by several randomly allocated Gaussian “windows” forcing judgements to be made based on this partial information. Over multiple trials, all potential cues are sampled, and the effectiveness of each window at predicting the judgement is determined. The modified bubbles strategy emphasises the distinction between central versus edge cues and localises the visual features used in judging one’s own body size. In addition, eye-movements were measured in conjunction with the bubbles paradigm and the results mapped onto a common reference space. This shows that although observers fixate centrally on the torso, they are actually directing their visual attention to the edges of the torso to gauge body width as an index of body size. The central fixations are simply the most efficient way of positioning the eye to make this estimation. Inaccurate observers are less precise in their central fixations and do not evenly allocate their attention to both sides of the torso’s edge, illustrating the importance of efficiently sampling the key information.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Kamila Irvine, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Kristofor McCarty, Northumbria University

Thomas Pollet, Northumbria University

Katri Cornelissen, Northumbria University

Prof Martin Tovee, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Piers Cornelissen, Nothumbria University


 

A critique of the Global Pact for the environment: a stillborn initiative or the foundation for Lex Anthropocenae?

Prof Duncan French, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, Lincoln Law School Prof Louis Kotze, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, Lincoln Law School

 

 

 

 

 

In May 2018, the process which may ultimately lead to the negotiation of a legally binding Global Pact for the environment formally commenced under the auspices of the United Nations General Assembly. Expectations for the Pact are high, evidenced in particular by its multiple and overlapping objectives: to serve as a generic binding instrument of international environmental law (IEL) principles; to integrate, consolidate, unify and ultimately entrench many of the fragmented principles of IEL; and to constitute the first global environmental human rights instrument. In the wake of the impending intergovernmental process, the paper offers a thorough critique of the draft Pact in its present iteration. We do so with the aim of evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the present draft Pact by interrogating: (a) its diplomatic and symbolic relevance and possible unique contribution at the policy level to global environmental law and governance, and (b) its potential at the operational level of IEL and global environmental governance, focusing on the extent to which the draft Pact accommodates both existing and more recent rules and principles for environmental protection. As the Pact’s primary ambition is to become a universally binding global treaty, it would be churlish not to recognise its potential for innovation, as well as the considerable opportunity that the negotiation of the Pact will have to generate broad-sweeping and positive impacts. However, our central thesis is that only if the Global Pact were to incorporate ambitious normative provisions to strengthen those public and private global governance efforts that aim to halt the deterioration of Earth system integrity, as well as to maintain and improve integrity, will it be able to offer a firm foundation of the type of Anthropocene Law, termed here as the Lex Anthropocenae, required to confront head-on the deep socio-ecological crisis of the Anthropocene.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science

Duncan French, University of Lincoln

Louis Kotze, University of Lincoln


 

Academic Freedom and World Class Universities: A virtuous circle?

Using empirical data from over 1500 respondents (drawn from across the UK) to a survey on academic freedom, and the Times Higher’s World University Rankings, this paper is a comparative assessment of the relationship between professed levels of defacto protection for academic freedom by teaching and research staff in individual UK universities, and their institution’s excellence, as evinced by world university rankings. The study reveals that normative protection for academic freedom is strongest in Russell Group universities and weakest in post-1992 institutions. Additionally, the professed level of protection for academic freedom reported by respondents to the survey is shown to have a positive relationship with the World Rankings’ positions of their institutions. Furthermore, the study considers whether academic freedom may be a prerequisite for, or defining characteristic of, a world-class university. Finally, the paper assesses the possible policy implications of this research for universities and their leaders, and higher educational policy makers, within the UK and beyond, seeking to improve the Times Higher’s World Ranking positions of their institutions.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Terence Karran, University of Lincoln, School of Education

Lucy Mallinson, University of Lincoln, Lincoln Higher Education Research Institute