Combining Our Virtual Isolation Discussions

In this presentation, Jamie, a PhD Student studying the pathways into teaching: exploring the preparation and retention of maths and science teachers, converses with his supervisor Rachael about their combined experiences of the virtual isolation over the past year. They discuss the challenges and benefits put upon them by the situation over the last year, such as research designs and data collection, and how together they have found innovative ways to overcome them. Finally, conclusions are drawn as to possible support for future researchers and supervisors to ensure that the journey whilst challenging is a successful and enjoyable one!


Dr Rachael Sharpe, School of Education
Mr Jamie Ainge, School of Education


Reflecting on PhD supervision during the pandemic.

Postgraduate Research students have faced a difficult time during the Covid-19 pandemic, when carefully planned research has been disrupted due to recurrent lockdowns, mental health problems have come to the fore, and the challenges of doing a doctorate have been made greater due to pressures on work and family. In this short talk, doctoral supervisors from the College of Social Science talk about their experience of supervising students during the pandemic.


Dr Hannah Henderson, School of Sport and Exercise Science
Dr Trish Jackman, School of Sport and Exercise Science
Dr Rachael Sharpe, School of Education
Dr Joss Winn, School of Education


 

Creating Connections in a Virtual World

When the Covid-19 pandemic hit in March 2020 in the UK, it quickly changed our day-to-day lives. With the closure of university facilities, doctoral researchers suddenly found themselves out of the postgraduate office and left to continue their studies from home. This shift triggered an almost overnight change in the environment surrounding many doctoral researchers, especially in terms of the interpersonal relationships with peers and supervisors. As a result, this may have increased the risk of social isolation. This presentation will provide an insight into the PGR Connect Series, which was organised to provide sport and exercise psychology postgraduate researchers at the University of Lincoln with a chance to present their work and connect with researchers at other institutions in the summer of 2020. The team at Lincoln Sport and Exercise Psychology Research will share their experiences of organising and presenting on the seminar series, which ran over nine weeks and eventually involved over 20 speakers from over a dozen institutions across six countries.


Dr Trish Jackman, School of Sport and Exercise Science
Rachel Langbein, School of Sport and Exercise Science
Rebecca Hawkins, School of Sport and Exercise Science
Ollie Williamson, School of Sport and Exercise Science
Dr Matthew Bird, School of Sport and Exercise Science


 

Overcoming the challenges of doctoral study during the pandemic.

Director of Studies, Dr Joss Winn, talks with colleague and PhD Professional candidate, Alison Raby, about the challenges she has faced during the pandemic when undertaking her research, An exploration of the personal tutoring experiences of Chinese students in the UK. The impact of Covid-19 has meant that Alison has had to rethink her data collection methods and timeline, and work around the cancellation of a planned trip to China.


Dr Joss Winn, School of Education

Ms Alison Raby, Department of Marketing Languages and Tourism


 

Navigating the Doctoral Journey During a Pandemic

The doctoral journey can be a winding road, throwing up challenges at every twist and turn but the arrival of Covid-19 and the resulting restrictions, created a host of challenges that could never have been predicted and rapidly changed the way we live. For doctoral researchers this meant the closure of university facilities, services at a halt for those working in the field and for some, data collection at a standstill. In this presentation two doctoral students from the University of Lincoln, share their experiences of their personal research journey during a pandemic and how they overcame the challenges they faced.


Dr Hannah Henderson – School of Sport and Exercise Science
Joanna Blackwell – School of Sport and Exercise Science
Georgia Clay – School of Sport and Exercise Science


 

Inter-Disciplinary Student Work Placements within a Care Home Setting: Improving Student Employability and Developing Social Connections – A Qualitative Evaluation

This article reports on the development, implementation and evaluation of a project to develop students’ employability skills by involving them in work experience within a care home. The aims of this project were (1) to describe how employability skills developed during the work experience (including knowledge and values relevant to the health and social care sector) and (2) to promote social engagement for residents living within the care home. In this descriptive qualitative study, 12 students from various disciplines across social science courses volunteered to participate following an advert to all students. Alongside three key care home staff, these students participated in two information sessions prior to involving residents in individual and group activities commencing in the following week. Qualitative, semi-structured, written evaluations were collected from the students and care home staff at three time points: immediately after the information sessions, immediately following volunteering sessions and at the end of the project, five months after the project commenced. Evaluations were analysed thematically using the principles of Braun and Clarke (2006) with the identified themes demonstrating students had developed skills, knowledge and understanding in the context of caring for older adults through their planning and implementation of activities, engaging and communicating with the residents, and working alongside care home staff. They reported benefiting from working as a team and commented on their perceived benefits to the residents. Students were able to build transferable skills which they felt would benefit them in future employment. Their participation resulted in a greater understanding of caring for older adults which students stated they can apply both in their working and social lives. The project provided an opportunity for peer education and experience of inter-disciplinary teamwork. The perceived benefits to residents included a positive impact on social engagement, communication and well-being.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science

Rachael Mason, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Rachael Hunt, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Ros Kane, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care


COVID-19 and the Responsibility to Protect Rohingya Refugees

On 1st April 2020, the Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect issued an atrocity alert special issue on COVID-19. This alert noted that COVID-19 would have particularly adverse implications for the ‘70 million people forcibly displaced by conflict, persecution and atrocity’, many of whom currently live in conditions which leave them vulnerable to the coronavirus.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Amber Smith, PhD Candidate, Lincoln Law School

Tom Welch, PhD Candidate, Lincoln Law School


PGR Connect Series

The PGR Connect Series drew to a close last week after nine excellent seminars over the course of July, August, and September. With the cancellation of many conferences in recent months and doctoral researchers now finding themselves working from home rather than alongside their peers in postgraduate offices, the sport and exercise psychology team in the School of Sport and Exercise Science (Twitter: @LincsSpExPsych) sought to fill these voids by organising a multi-institutional, international seminar series throughout the summer period. The goals of the series were to provide doctoral researchers in the area of sport and exercise psychology with an opportunity to showcase their work, obtain feedback, and facilitate networking opportunities for attendees. While the presenters on the series were all doctoral researchers, the series was also attended by undergraduate and Masters students in the School of Sport and Exercise Science, as well as academics from the UK, Ireland, and Australia. Over the course of the nine weekly seminars, 22 speakers from 13 institutions across the UK, Ireland, New Zealand, and Australia delivered talks about their research. Five speakers from the University of Lincoln presented their doctoral research on the series: Rachel Langbein, Oliver Williamson, Rebecca Hawkins, Joanna Blackwell (all School of Sport and Exercise Science), and Thomas George (School of Health and Social Care). The sport and exercise psychology team will continue to run virtual internal seminars throughout the year. Please contact Trish Jackman (pjackman@lincoln.ac.uk) to hear more or get involved.

PGR Connect Seminar Series

Staff in the School of Sport and Exercise Science are organising a seminar series to connect postgraduate researchers (PGRSs) at the University of Lincoln with PGRs at institutions across the UK, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand. Organised by staff specialising in sport and exercise psychology (Twitter: @LincsSpExPsych), the PGR Connect Seminar Series will run on a weekly basis (Tuesday 9-10.15am UK time) from July 7th to September 1st. The purpose of the series is to create a supportive environment that allows PGRs to share their research and develop their network. Each week, 2-3 PGRs will share the latest findings from their research on topics in sport and exercise psychology, as well as related areas. For more information, please contact Trish Jackman (pjackman@lincoln.ac.uk).