College of Social Science Research Showcase 2022

Each year, we like to celebrate the hard work and exciting impact of the research taking place within the College of Social Science through an annual Research Showcase. This year we have decided to have two overall themes for the showcase.

The morning session will concentrate on showcasing our college’s work relating to health and wellbeing, the partnerships locally that associate with this and the link with the Lincoln Medical School. In the afternoon, we will hear from research units across the college to promote internal collaboration, including PGR activity as well as collaborative work.

The showcase will be hosted in the Lincoln Medical School on Wednesday 20th July 2022 between 09.00 – 17.00. This event will also be live streamed via our College Research Blog.

To attend the College of Social Science Annual Research Showcase, you can now register for the full day, or afternoon session via: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/college-of-social-science-annual-showcase-2022-registration-194292804007

Please be aware, the afternoon session does not guarantee you a seat in the lecture theatre where the academics are presenting. The presentations will be live streamed into the lecture theatre next door, allowing you to still participate in all networking opportunities.

 

Should there be seats available in the other lecture theatre, these will be given on a first come first serve basis.

We hope you will join us for what promises to be an exciting and thought provoking day.

Please email bmonaghan@lincoln.ac.uk with any enquiries.

Please see below for the full agenda

Networking opportunities will be available after each session

The effectiveness of primary care streaming in emergency departments on decision-making and patient flow and safety – A realist evaluation

Primary care streaming was implemented in UK Emergency Departments (EDs) to manage an increasing demand for urgent care. We aimed to explore its effectiveness in EDs with different primary care models and identify contexts and mechanisms that influenced outcomes: streaming patients to the most appropriate clinician or service, ED flow and patient safety.

We observed streaming and interviewed ED and primary care staff during case study visits to 10 EDs in England. We used realist methodology, synthesising a middle-range theory with our qualitative data to refine and create a set of theories that explain relationships between contexts, mechanisms and outcomes.

Mechanisms contributing to the effectiveness of primary care streaming were: quality of decision-making, patient flow, redeploying staff, managing patients across streams, the implementation of governance protocols, guidance, training, service evaluation and quality improvement efforts. Experienced nurses and good teamworking and strategic and operational management were key contextual factors.


Michelle Edwards, Cardiff University, Division of Population Medicine

Alison Cooper, Cardiff University, Division of Population Medicine

Thomas Hughes, John Radcliffe Hospital, Emergency Department

Freya Davies, Cardiff University, Division of Population Medicine

Delyth Price, Cardiff University, Division of Population Medicine

Pippa Anderson, Swansea University, Swansea Centre for Health Economics

Bridie Evans, Swansea University, Swansea University Medical School

Andrew Carson-Stevens, Cardiff University, Division of Population Medicine

Jeremy Dale, Warwick University, Academic Primary Care

Peter Hibbert, Macquarie University, Centre for Healthcare Resilience and Implementation Science

Barbara Harrington, Cardiff University, Division of Population Medicine

Julie Hepburn, Cardiff University, Division of Population Medicine

Aloysius Niroshan Siriwardena, University of Lincoln, Community and Health Research Unit

Helen Snooks, Swansea University, Swansea University Medical School

Adrian Edwards, Cardiff University, Division of Population Medicine


Videogames, Twitter and Far-Right Extremism: An Analysis of Twitter Hashtag Networks

Many social network theories emphasise the importance of network properties. Strong networks with many interlocking and reinforcing connections are essential to reinforcing beliefs. Homophily within networks arises as individuals within them  seek out and maintain strong connections with those who are like them. People seeking to join a network are often already connected to people who hold similar beliefs. Thus, as more people join the network, the strength of the ties between individuals grows stronger and homophily increases.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Sam Andrews, University of Lincoln, School of Social and Political Sciences

Joshua Skoczylis, University of Lincoln, School of Social and Political Sciences