‘We are fighting a tide that keeps coming against us’: a mixed method exploration of stressors in an English county police force

Against a backdrop of austerity, this mixed method paper provides a contemporary understanding of stressors in English policing by examining stressors experienced by police employees in the UK. In the first study, police officers (n = 223) and police staff (n = 134) in a county police force in England completed measures of operational and organisational stressors. Significantly higher scores were found for operational and organisational stressors in police officers compared to police staff. Police officers also reported higher operational and organisational stressor scores in comparison to norms for an international sample. In the second study, 27 police employees from the same force participated in focus groups exploring stressors in policing. The qualitative findings built on the first study by providing detailed insights into stressors presently experienced by police employees and the impact of police reform on stress. Implications of the findings and recommendations for future research are discussed.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science

Patricia C. Jackman, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Georgia Clay, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Adam H. Coussens, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science and Newcastle University, School of Biomedical, Nutritional, and Sport Sciences

Matthew D. Bird, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Hannah Henderson, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science


 

Injury Incidence Across the Menstrual Cycle in International Footballers

With the professionalization of women’s football, training, and match demands have significantly increased in recent years (Datson et al., 20142017). The overall injury incidence is similar to male football, although the proportion of severe injuries has been shown to be higher in women’s football (Mufty et al., 2015Roos et al., 2017) which is associated with significant costs (Gebert et al., 2020). Female football players are reported to have 21% more absence due to injury compared to men, primarily due to greater incidence of severe knee and ankle ligament injuries, with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries occurring 2–8 times more often in female soccer players (Larruskain et al., 2018Lin et al., 2018).


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science

Dan Martin, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Kate Timmins, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Charlotte Cowie, The Football Association

Jon Alty, The Football Association

Ritan Mehta, The Football Association

Alicia Tang, The Football Association

Ian Varley, Nottingham Trent University, Department of Sport and Exercise Science


The effect of face masks and sunglasses on identity and expression recognition with super-recognizers and typical observers

Dr Kay Ritchie, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology

Face masks present a new challenge to face identification (here matching) and emotion recognition in Western cultures. Here, we present the results of three experiments that test the effect of masks, and also the effect of sunglasses (an occlusion that individuals tend to have more experienced with) on (i) familiar face matching, (ii) unfamiliar face matching and (iii) emotion categorization. Occlusion reduced accuracy in all three tasks, with most errors in the mask condition; however, there was little difference in performance for faces in masks compared with faces in sunglasses. Super-recognizers, people who are highly skilled at matching unconcealed faces, were impaired by occlusion, but at the group level, performed with higher accuracy than controls on all tasks. Results inform psychology theory with implications for everyday interactions, security and policing in a mask-wearing society.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Eilidh Noyes, University of Huddersfield, Department of Psychology

Josh P. Davis, University of Greenwich, School of Human Sciences

Nikolay Petrov, University of Greenwich, School of Human Sciences

Katie L. H. Gray, University of Reading, School of Psychology

Kay L. Ritchie, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology


Factors supporting career pathway development amongst advanced practice nurses in Thailand: A cross-sectional survey

Background

Thailand has recently reformed its health care system and this change has contributed to the rapidly increasing need for skilled and experienced specialist nurses and in 2003 a new Advanced Practice Nursing role was formally introduced. While Advanced Practice Nursing is now accepted as a clinical career option, there is little understanding of the factors conducive to successful career development. This study offers the first examination of factors associated with successful career progression for Advanced Practice Nurses in Thailand.

Objectives

1. To provide a description of the Advanced Practice Nurse population in Thailand, as represented by a purposive stratified national sample. 2. To examine the factors influencing successful career pathway development of Advanced Practice Nurses in Thailand. 3. To examine the factors which influence the extent to which Advanced Practice Nurses in Thailand engage in evidence-based practice and research.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science

Aranya Rakhab, Surathani Rajabhat University, Faculty of Nursing and University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Christine Jackson, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Kittikorn Nilmanat, Prince of Songkla University, Faculty of Nursing

Tony Butterworth, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Roslyn Kane, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care