Following Young Fathers Further: The impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown on young fathers

Today, Following Young Fathers Further (FYFF) have announced the launch of two new briefing papers based on wave 1 of their research.

As part of this short series FYFF present emergent findings of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown on the parenting journeys and support needs of the seventeen young fathers they interviewed. The papers can be accessed via the link below and on the Findings and Publications tab of the FYFF website.

British Sleep Society: the COVID-19 pandemic response

The current pandemic caused by a novel coronavirus, named COVID-19, holds the entire world to ransom. A proportion of the infected patients becomes critically ill, with millions being infected and hundreds of thousands who have died so far. In some countries, national lockdown restrictions are being slowly lifted, but the World Health Organization (WHO) still registers increasing numbers of confirmed COVID-19 infections across its membership states.

Against this background, the BSS brought together doctors from the respiratory and critical care response teams in Wuhan, China and London, UK in a webinar to exchange their knowledge and expertise and discuss current best practice in the management of patients with COVID-19. Following their presentations, sleep experts from the Executive Committee of the BSS discussed the impact of the pandemic and lockdown on sleep and shared practical advice regarding sleep health.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science research

Joerg Steier, British Sleep Society, Lichfield, UK; Sleep Disorders Centre, Guy’s & St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; and King’s College London, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, London, UK

Simon Durrant, British Sleep Society, Lichfield, UK; University of Lincoln, Lincoln Sleep Research Centre and School of Psychology, Lincoln, UK

Alanna Hare, British Sleep Society, Lichfield, UK; Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK

on behalf of the BSS Executive Committee


 

COVID-19 and the Responsibility to Protect Rohingya Refugees

On 1st April 2020, the Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect issued an atrocity alert special issue on COVID-19. This alert noted that COVID-19 would have particularly adverse implications for the ‘70 million people forcibly displaced by conflict, persecution and atrocity’, many of whom currently live in conditions which leave them vulnerable to the coronavirus.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Amber Smith, PhD Candidate, Lincoln Law School

Tom Welch, PhD Candidate, Lincoln Law School


Faster Visual Information Processing in Video Gamers Is Associated With EEG Alpha Amplitude Modulation

Video gaming, specifically action video gaming, seems to improve a range of cognitive functions. The basis for these improvements may be attentional control in conjunction with reward-related learning to amplify the execution of goal-relevant actions while suppressing goal-irrelevant actions. Given that EEG alpha power reflects inhibitory processing, a core component of attentional control, it might represent the electrophysiological substrate of cognitive improvement in video gaming. The aim of this study was to test whether non-video gamers (NVGs), non-action video gamers (NAVGs) and action video gamers (AVGs) exhibit differences in EEG alpha power, and whether this might account for differences in visual information processing as operationalized by the theory of visual attention (TVA). Forty male volunteers performed a visual short-term memory paradigm where they memorized shape stimuli depicted on circular stimulus displays at six different exposure durations while their EEGs were recorded. Accuracy data was analyzed using TVA-algorithms. There was a positive correlation between the extent of post-stimulus EEG alpha power attenuation (10–12 Hz) and speed of information processing across all participants. Moreover, both EEG alpha power attenuation and speed of information processing were modulated by an interaction between group affiliation and time on task, indicating that video gamers showed larger EEG alpha power attenuations and faster information processing over time than NVGs – with AVGs displaying the largest increase. An additional regression analysis affirmed this observation. From this we concluded that EEG alpha power might be a promising neural substrate for explaining cognitive improvement in video gaming.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Yannick Hilla,  Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Department of Psychology, Research Unit of Biological Psychology

Jorg Von Mankowski, Technische Universität München, Chair of Communication Networks

Julia Foecker, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Paul Sauseng, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Department of Psychology, Research Unit of Biological Psychology


 

Associations Between Media Representations of Physical, Personality, and Social Attributes by Gender: A Content Analysis of Children’s Animated Film Characters

Dr Tracey Thornborrow, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology

This study conducted a content analysis of 130 characters from 24 recent popular animated children’s films and examined the associations between physical appearance, personality, and social attributes by gender. We found that physical attractiveness was associated with having more friends and receiving more affection among male characters, and negatively associated with weight status among females. Also, wearing close-fitting clothes was associated with attractiveness among females and with popularity, musculature, and strength among males. However, being muscular, stronger, and taller was associated with less intelligence among males. Regarding gender-stereotyped body ideals, female characters were portrayed as slimmer and attractive more frequently than males, who tended to be larger, muscular, and stronger. Results suggest that mainstream media’s narrow and stereotypically gendered appearance standards are prevalent in content aimed at children and highlight the need for continuing research examining their impact on children’s body image and gender development.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Maria Pilar Leon Gonzalez, University of Castilla-La Mancha and University Alfonso X el Sabio

Alvaro Infantes-Paniagua, University of Castilla-La Mancha

Tracey Thornborrow , University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Onofre Contreras Jordan, University of Castilla-La Mancha


 

Restoring Harmony in the Lifeworld? Identity, Learning, and Leaving Preelite Sport

Prof Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Sport provides many youth participants with a central life project, and yet very few eventually fulfill their athletic dreams, which may lead them to disengage from sport entirely. Many studies have explored the processes of athletic retirement, but little is known about how youth athletes actually reconstruct their relationship with sport and embodiment postretirement. The authors explored these issues in the story of “Pilvi,” a Finnish alpine skier who disengaged from sport in her late adolescence. Employing an existential-phenomenological approach, they conducted six low-structured interviews with Pilvi, combined with visual methods, and identified key themes relating to the body, space, culture, and time. Their findings highlight the difficulty of building a new relationship with sport and the often restrictive cultural horizons of sport and exercise culture that limit the “possible selves.” The authors discuss the significant implications for applied practitioners helping youth athletes and effectively supporting them in leaving their sport.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Noora J. Rankainen, University of Jyväskylä

Tatiana V. Ryba, University of Jyväskylä

Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science


 

A Program to Reduce Stigma Toward Mental Illness and Promote Mental Health Literacy and Help-Seeking in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Student-Athletes

Dr Matt Bird, Univesity of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Student-athletes are susceptible to mental health problems that disrupt optimal functioning and well-being. Despite having many protective factors, student-athletes represent an at-risk subgroup of college students who experience mental health concerns due to the distress of balancing multiple obligations. However, many student-athletes underutilize psychological services. Stigma is the main barrier preventing student-athletes from seeking help, and mental health literacy (MHL) interventions addressing knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders have traditionally been used to destigmatize mental illness. This study investigated the impact of a 4-week program on stigma, MHL, and attitudes and intentions toward seeking help with 33 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I student-athletes. The program was composed of four science-based interventions—MHL, empathy, counter stereotyping, and contact—delivered face-to-face within a group setting. MHL, attitudes toward seeking help, and intentions to seek counselling improved from preintervention to postintervention and to 1-month follow-up. Self-stigma was reduced from preintervention to postintervention.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Graig M. Chow, Florida State University and University of California

Matthew D. Bird, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Nicole T Gabana, Florida State University and University of Massachusetts Athletics

Brandon T. Cooper, Florida State University

Martin A. Swanbrow Becker, Florida State University

Mixed methods in pre-hospital research: understanding complex clinical problems

Healthcare is becoming increasingly complex. The pre-hospital setting is no exception, especially when considering the unpredictable environment. To address complex clinical problems and improve quality of care for patients, researchers need to use innovative methods to create the necessary depth and breadth of knowledge. Quantitative approaches such as randomised controlled trials and observational (e.g. cross-sectional, case control, cohort) methods, along with qualitative approaches including interviews, focus groups and ethnography, have traditionally been used independently to gain understanding of clinical problems and how to address these. Both approaches, however, have drawbacks: quantitative methods focus on objective, numerical data and provide limited understanding of context, whereas qualitative methods explore more subjective aspects and provide perspective, but can be harder to demonstrate rigour. We argue that mixed methods research, where quantitative and qualitative methods are integrated, is an ideal solution to comprehensively understand complex clinical problems in the pre-hospital setting.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Gregory Whitley, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Scott Munro, South East Coast Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust University of Surrey

Pippa Hemmingway, University of Nottingham

Graham Law, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Niro Siriwardena, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Debbie Cookie, University of Surrey

Tom Quinn, Kingston University & St George’s, University of London