Be Inspired! Lecture: Dr Anna Tarrant – Becoming a Future (research) Leader: a story of my academic journey

Dr Anna Tarrant, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Social and Political Science

In this presentation, Anna tells the story of her journey to an award of a UKRI Future Leaders Fellowship. These prestigious fellowships support researchers to make the transition from early to established career, as well as to internationalise their research. The development of the proposal required careful consideration, not only of the planned research, but also how the Fellow expects to develop their leadership in research. Anna therefore provides an overview of the planned study, ‘Following Young Fathers Further’ and its potential to advance theoretical, methodological and substantive agendas with real policy and practice implications for young fathers. She also considers the mechanisms for ensuring the success of the bid and how she plans to take this forward as her journey to leadership progresses.

  • Tuesday 3rd March 2020
  • Lecture 6pm
  • Wine Reception 7pm
  • Minerva Building – Jackson Lecture Theatre

Anna Tarrant is an Associate Professor in Sociology based in the School of Social and Political Sciences, her research has broadly focused on men’s care responsibilities and support needs, particularly in low-income families. This work has been funded by a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellowship (2014-2018) and the Leeds Social Sciences Institute Impact Acceleration Account (2016-2017).

Anna is currently a steering group member for the Fatherhood Development Programme and for the Aspiring to be a ‘Child Friendly Lincoln’ initiative called ‘Children of Lincoln’ chaired by Dr Sue Bond-Taylor. She has also recently been appointed to the editorial board of Sociology and Gender, Place and Culture.

This lecture is free to attend, but booking is essential:

The Evolution Of British Gerontology: Personal Perspectives and Historical Developments

Prof Mo Ray, University of Lincoln, College of Social science, School of Health and Social Care

Ageing, it now seems, is everybody’s business. Wherever we turn these days, older people are visible in the British media: on television and radio, and in advertisements. Actors, celebrities and public figures are documenting their experiences and thoughts about ageing at a rapid rate of knots; others are writing or making documentaries about living with, or caring for, family members – often with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias; while the anti-ageing and beauty industry exhorts us to stave off the signs of growing older for as long as we possibly can. Paradoxically, alongside this increasing visibility, has been an ever-present sense that population ageing – and older people themselves – is somehow to blame for many of society’s current problems. Indeed, proponents of ‘apocalyptic demography’ (Robertson, 1990) make uncritical use of statistics to fuel alarmist concern and generate moral panic amongst the media, government and the general population (Gee and Gutman, 2000; Bytheway and Johnson, 2010). This book, and the research project on which it is based, is located at the intersection of this paradox.

 

Our contention is that much popular and policy understanding of ageing and older people often has very little basis in the growing body of national and international gerontological research which has been undertaken over the past 40-50 years and that, as yet, we know very little about the evolution of this inter and multidisciplinary field from the perspectives of those who have been instrumental in its growth and development. Consequently, this chapter begins our sociohistorical examination by considering how gerontology first emerged, before going on to describe the ‘Ageing of British Gerontology’ research project. Our mixed method project looks at gerontology’s evolution through the contributions and experiences of senior figures in British gerontology and contextualises, supplements and integrates this new empirical work with a detailed examination of the archives of the British Society of Gerontology (BSG). It is our research into, and analyses of these materials and interviews, which are at the heart of the book. The chapter concludes by briefly introducing the 50 gerontologists who took part, as well as ourselves.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Mo Ray, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Miriam Bernard, Keele University

Jackie Reynolds, Keele University


Student as Producer

Prof Mike Neary, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Social and Political Sciences

Student as Producer brings critical theory to life in a contribution to the dynamic, emerging genre of critical higher education studies. It is for students and teachers who want to change the world through critical pedagogy and popular education.


University of Lincoln, College of Social science Research

Mike Neary, School of Social and Political Sciences


 

Directive Leading Questions and Preparation Technique Effects on Witness Accuracy

Dr Georgina Gous, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology

The use of leading questions during cross-examination can undermine the accuracy and completeness of evidence presented in court. Furthermore, increasing numbers of general witnesses are arriving in court unprepared for the experience. In this study, 60 mock witnesses from England and Wales were allocated to one of the three preparation conditions: (a) those who received no familiarization with the cross-examination process, (b) those who received a guidance booklet on cross-examination procedures, and (c) those who underwent an alternative rapport-building protocol. The participants observed a hit-and-run scenario video clip before being cross-examined with either (a) non-directive leading questions or (b) directive leading questions. The results showed that directive leading questioning styles were most detrimental to witness accuracy. Neither familiarization with the types of questions typically employed during cross-examination nor the rapport-building protocol were found to be effective as a preparation strategy to increase accurate responses compared against a control group. Consideration of the impact of directive leading question styles on all witnesses in court seems necessary.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Georgina Gous, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Jacqueline Wheatcroft, University of Gloucestershire


 

Hyper-realistic Face Masks in a Live Passport-Checking Task

Dr Robin Kramer, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology

Hyper-realistic face masks have been used as disguises in at least one border crossing and in numerous criminal cases. Experimental tests using these masks have shown that viewers accept them as real faces under a range of conditions. Here, we tested mask detection in a live identity verification task. Fifty-four visitors at the London Science Museum viewed a mask wearer at close range (2 m) as part of a mock passport check. They then answered a series of questions designed to assess mask detection, while the masked traveller was still in view. In the identity matching task, 8% of viewers accepted the mask as matching a real photo of someone else, and 82% accepted the match between masked person and masked photo. When asked if there was any reason to detain the traveller, only 13% of viewers mentioned a mask. A further 11% picked disguise from a list of suggested reasons. Even after reading about mask-related fraud, 10% of viewers judged that the traveller was not wearing a mask. Overall, mask detection was poor and was not predicted by unfamiliar face matching performance. We conclude that hyper-realistic face masks could go undetected during live identity checks.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

David J. Robertson, University of York, Department of Psychology

Jet G. Sanders, University of York, Department of Psychology

Alice Towler, University of York, Department of Psychology

Robin Kramer, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Josh Spowage, University of York, Department of Psychology

Alish Byrne, University of York, Department of Psychology

A. Mike Burton, University of York, Department of Psychology

Rob Jenkins, University of York, Department of Psychology


Effect of Group Size and Individual Characteristics on Intergroup Encounters in Primates

Dr Bonaventura Majolo, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology

Intergroup encounters are common in nonhuman primates and can vary from affiliative to aggressive. We extracted data from the literature to test five different hypotheses: 1) where there are group size differences between opposing groups, whether the larger group is more likely to win an intergroup encounter than the smaller group; 2) whether the likelihood of a group engaging in aggressive intergroup encounters increases with group size; and 3–5) whether dominant, older individuals, and/or males are more likely to participate aggressively in intergroup encounters than subordinate, younger individuals and/or females. Our data set comprised 52 studies on 31 primate species (3 lemur species, 5 New World monkeys, 19 Old World monkeys, and 4 apes). We found that the larger group is more likely to win an encounter against a smaller group than vice versa. We found no significant relationship between group size and propensity to be aggressive during intergroup encounters. We found weak/no support for the effect of age, dominance rank, and sex on the frequency of aggression displayed toward outgroup individuals during intergroup encounters. Species- and population-specific differences in inter- and intragroup competition and in the degree of the unequal distribution of resources across group members may explain why age, dominance rank, and sex are not strong predictors of aggression during intergroup encounters.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Bonaventura Majolo, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Aurora deBortoli Vizioli, Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies

Laura Martinez-Íñigo,University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Julia Lehmann, University of Roehampton


Suicide and probation: A systematic review of the literature

Dr Coral Sirdifield, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research, School of Health and Social Care

A narrative systematic review was undertaken of the literature concerning the health of people on probation. In this paper, we provide an up-to-date summary of what is known about suicide and suicidal ideation and probation. This includes estimates of prevalence and possible predictors of suicide and suicidal ideation. Searches were conducted on nine databases from January 2000 to May 2017, key journals from 2000 to September 2017, and the grey literature. A total of 5125 papers were identified in the initial electronic searches but after careful double-blind review only one research paper related to this topic met our criteria, although a further 12 background papers were identified which are reported. We conclude that people on probation are a very high risk group for completed suicide, and factors associated with this include drug overdose, mental health problems, and poor physical health. There is a clear need for high quality partnership working between probation and mental health services, and investment in services, to support appropriate responses to suicide risk.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Coral Sirdifield, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Charlie Brooker, University of London,  Royal Holloway, Centre for Sociology and Criminology

Rebecca Marples, University of Suffolk, School of Law and Social Sciences


 

 

Aesthetic Image Statistics Vary with Artistic Genre

Prof George Mather, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology

Research to date has not found strong evidence for a universal link between any single low-level image statistic, such as fractal dimension or Fourier spectral slope, and aesthetic ratings of images in general. This study assessed whether different image statistics are important for artistic images containing different subjects and used partial least squares regression (PLSR) to identify the statistics that correlated most reliably with ratings. Fourier spectral slope, fractal dimension and Shannon entropy were estimated separately for paintings containing landscapes, people, still life, portraits, nudes, animals, buildings and abstracts. Separate analyses were performed on the luminance and colour information in the images. PLSR fits showed shared variance of up to 75% between image statistics and aesthetic ratings. The most important statistics and image planes varied across genres. Variation in statistics may reflect characteristic properties of the different neural sub-systems that process different types of image.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

George Mather, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology