Protein Shakes May Not Be the Answer for Post-Gym Muscle Pain, New Research Reveals

Dr Mark Smith, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Sport amd Exercise Science UoL CoSS Research Dr Thomas Gee, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Sport and Exercise Science UoL CoSS Research

 

 

 

 

Protein shakes have long been touted as a gym bag essential, consumed by gym-goers in an effort to boost muscle recovery and minimise post-workout muscle soreness, but they may not be the most effective way to relieve aching muscles, according to a new study.

Research has found that neither whey-protein based shakes nor milk-based formulas enhanced the rate of muscle recovery following resistance training when compared to a carbohydrate only drink. The study is the first to compare the effectiveness of the two different protein formulas.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Thomas Gee, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Mark Smith, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Thomas Woolrich, University of Lincoln, Sport and Exercise Science


 

Effectiveness of non-pharmacological interventions for insomnia in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a set of neurodevelopmental disorders characterised by behavioural, communication and social impairments. The prevalence of sleep disturbances in children with ASD is 40–80%, with significant effects on quality of life for the children and carers.

This systematic review is aimed to synthesise evidence of the effects of behavioural interventions to improve sleep among children with ASD.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Sophie Keogh, Lincolnshire Partnership Foundation Trust

Christopher Bridle, University of Lincoln, Lincoln Institute for Health

Niro Siriwardena, University of Lincoln, Lincoln Institute for Health

Amulya Nadkarni, Lincolnshire Partnership Foundation Trust

Despina Laparidou, University of Lincoln, Lincoln Institute for Health

Simon Durrant, University of Lincoln, Lincoln Institute for Health

Niko Kargas, University of Lincoln, Lincoln Institute for Health

Graham Law, University of Lincoln, Lincoln Institute for Health

Ffion Curtis, University of Lincoln, Lincoln Institute for Health


 

A meta-analysis of interindividual differences in innovation

Dr Bonaventura Majolo, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology, UoL CoSS research

The ability to innovate and the social transmission of innovations have played a central role in human evolution. However, innovation is also crucial for other animals, by allowing them to cope with novel socioecological challenges. Although innovation plays such a central role in animals’ lives, we still do not know the conditions required for innovative behaviour to emerge. Here, we focused on interindividual differences in innovation by (1) extensively reviewing existing literature on innovative behaviour in animals and (2) quantitatively testing the different evolutionary hypotheses that have been proposed to explain interindividual variation in innovation propensity during foraging tasks. We ran a series of phylogenetically controlled mixed-effects meta-regression models to determine which hypotheses (if any) are supported by currently available empirical studies. Our analyses show that innovation is more common in individuals that are older and belong to the larger sex, but also in more neophilic and/or explorative individuals. Moreover, these effects change depending on the study setting (i.e. wild versus captive). Our results provide no clear support to the excess of energy or the bad competitor hypotheses and suggest that study setting and interindividual differences in traits related to personality are also important predictors of innovation.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Federica Amici, University of Leipzig, Faculty of Life Science

Anja Widdig, University of Leipzig, Faculty of Life Science

Julia Lehmann, University of Roehampton, Department of Life Sciences

Bonaventura Majolo, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology


 

Rapid sensory gain with emotional distracters precedes attentional deployment from a foreground task

Dr Matt Craddock, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology UoL Reseach CoSS

 

The steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP), an electrophysiological marker of attentional resource allocation, has recently been demonstrated to serve as a neural signature of emotional content extraction from a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP). SSVEP amplitude was reduced for streams of emotional relative to neutral scenes passively viewed at 6 Hz (~167 ms per image), but it was enhanced for emotional relative to neutral scenes when viewed as 4 Hz RSVP (250 ms per image). Here, we investigated whether these seemingly contradictory observations may be related to different dynamics in the allocation of attentional resources as a consequence of stimulation frequency.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Valeria Bekhtereva, University of Leipzig, Institute of Psychology

Matt Craddock, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Christopher Gundach, University of Leipzig, Institute of Psychology

Matthias Muller, University of Leipzig, Institute of Psychology


 

Heterogeneity in Disordered Gambling: Decision-Making and Impulsivity in Gamblers Grouped by Preferred Form

Dr Amanda Roberts, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology, UoL CoSS research

Previous research has indicated that disordered gamblers display deficits in impulsivity and risky decision-making, compared to healthy control groups. However, disordered gamblers are not a homogenous group, and differences in performance on neurocognitive tasks may be related to the form of gambling in which an individual chooses to engage. The present study used neurocognitive tasks and questionnaire measures to ascertain group differences in gamblers grouped by preferred form of gambling.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Steve Sharman, University of East London, School of Psychology and University of Cambridge, Department of Psychology

Luke Clark, University of Cambridge, Department of Psychology and University of British Columbia, Department of Psychology

Amanda Roberts, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Rosanna Michalczuk, University of Cambridge, Department of Psychology and Bethlem Royal Hospital, South London and Maudsley Trust

Rachel Cocks, University of Cambridge, Department of Psychology and University of London, Royal Holloway

Henrietta Bowden-Joes, National Problem Gambling Clinic and Imperial College London, Faculty of Medicine


 

Abandoned Women’: Transnational Marriages and Gendered Legal Citizens

Abandonment of women in transnational marriages can be understood in the context of specific social milieus of community and kinship relations and legal jurisdictions associated with specific cultures of law. As a sociological-legal category that dismantles the myth of ‘flexible citizenship’ in transnational migration, abandonment must be seen in an experiential matrix constituted by the graded/differentiated diaspora, legal frameworks, and institutional structures, which frame the gendered citizen. This article reads stories of abandonment in legal documents where testimonies are mediated by legal practitioners for ameliorative justice through the court, in tandem with personal narratives of abandonment as reported to the authors. Through this reading, the article explores the way particular narratives of personal hurt and ‘personal/private’ identity – drawing from membership in the family and community – relate with the public identity of the legal citizen, the public governance of marriage by the protective/paternal state, and the ‘promise of happiness’ in marriage.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Sundari Anitha, University of Lincoln, School of Social and Political Science

Harshita Yalamarty, York University


 

Lay Participation in the Adjudication of Legal Disputes: A Legal-Historical and Comparative Analysis Focusing on the People’s Republic of China and Its Special Administrative Region Hong Kong

Dr Andra Le Roux-Kemp, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, Lincoln Law School UoL CoSS research

This article offers a comprehensive, legal-historical and comparative analysis of the respective modes of adjudication adopted in the People’s Republic of China and its Special Administrative Region of Hong Kong, for as far as these make provision for the participation of ordinary citizens in the adjudication of criminal legal disputes. The focus on lay participation in the criminal legal proceedings of these two jurisdictions serves as an example of legal transplants from other “Western” jurisdictions to the “East” through conquest, colonisation, and legal reform. The critical analysis and review of these legal transplants as provided for here, not only elucidate the unique laws and legal systems of these two jurisdictions operating under the one country two systems principle, it also raises questions with reference to its distinct, contemporary Chinese context.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Andra Le Roux-Kemp, University of Lincoln, Lincoln Law School