How patients adjust psychologically to the experience of head and neck cancer: A grounded theory

Numerous physical and psychological challenges are recognised as consequences of head and neck cancer and its treatment, but little is known about how patients adjust psychologically to these experiences. This study aimed to develop a theoretical understanding of the processes patients engage in when adjusting to head and neck cancer. Twelve patients participated in semi‐structured interviews conducted individually and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using grounded theory methodology. Analysis generated a core category of “modifying my relationship to the changes cancer brings,” which encompassed 11 processes patients engaged in throughout their adjustment: “survive mode,” “instrumental support from others,” “making a choice,” “developing own understanding,” “acceptance,” “talking with others,” “making changes,” “redefining or regaining normality,” “managing emotions/distressing thoughts,” “putting things into perspective” and “barriers to progress.” Contrasting findings are discussed, and a model of psychological adjustment to head and neck cancer is proposed. The study found that patients engage in a series of processes throughout adjustment to head and neck cancer, which broadly map on to the cancer treatment trajectory, though these processes did not appear to be specific to head and neck cancer. The proposed model may be used as a framework to guide psychological interventions.


 

University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Louise Calver, Division of Psychiatry & Applied Psychology, University of Nottingham

Anna Tickle, Division of Psychiatry & Applied Psychology, University of Nottingham

Sanchia Biswas, Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, King’s Mill Hospital

Nima Moghaddam, Trent DClinPsy Programme, University of Lincoln


 

Informing care related decisions with the Cognitive Daisy

Dr Petra Pollux, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology UoL CoSS ResearchDr John Hudson, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology, UoL CoSS research

 

 

 

 

This study examined how care practices may be modified by the Cognitive Daisy. At pre and post Cognitive Daisy training, care staff stated how they would respond to a series of hypothetical case studies. We found unequivocal evidence of the Cognitive Daisy’s potential to positively inform person-centred care related decisions.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr John Hudson, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Dr Petra Pollux, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology


 

South Asian feminisms in Britain: Traversing gender, race, class and religion

This article maps the trajectory of South Asian feminist struggles in Britain and analyses the key issues that have shaped them. We begin by setting the context for the emergence of a distinctive South Asian feminist voice out of existing forms of self-organisation and resistance within minority communities and its location at the intersection of gender, race and class. We then move on to outline the nature and effects of four decades of activism, policy interventions and practice by South Asian feminist groups in Britain. We locate this activism within the context of government policy and statutory practice that has shifted from multiculturalism to multifaithism and highlight the implications for women’s and girls’ rights and the costs to secular feminist provision, particularly in relation to combatting violence against women and girls. Lastly, we also analyse how recent neo-liberal policies of austerity and shrinking welfare provision pose key ideological challenges for South Asian feminist organising.

Making a Spectacle of Yourself: The Effect of Glasses and Sunglasses on Face Perception

UoL CoSS research, Facial Recognition

We investigated the effect of wearing glasses and sunglasses on the perception of social traits from faces and on face matching. Participants rated images of people wearing no glasses, glasses and sunglasses on three social traits (trustworthiness, competence and attractiveness). Wearing sunglasses reduced ratings of trustworthiness. Participants also performed a matching task (telling whether two images show the same person or not) with pairs of images both wearing no glasses, glasses or sunglasses, and all combinations of eyewear. Incongruent eyewear conditions (e.g., one image wearing glasses and the other wearing sunglasses, etc.) reduced performance. Further analysis comparing performance on congruent and incongruent eyewear trials showed that our effects were driven by match trial performance, where differences in eyewear decreased accuracy. For same-eyewear-condition pairs, performance was poorer for pairs of images both wearing sunglasses than no glasses. Our results extend and update previous research on the effect of eyewear on face perception.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Daisy Graham, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology

Kay Ritchie, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology


 

Scientific Literacy: Who Needs it in a ‘Black Box’ Technological Society?

This paper will question the widely accepted position that there is a need for widespread, scientific literacy that spans a broad range of topics if that literacy lacks the conceptual depth, and/or intellectual rigor, to provide any basis for rational, scientifically informed, choices. The paper will present an argument that, in fact, it would be more effective if functional, widespread, scientific literacy were only taught in Key Stage 3 (age 11-14) where it would focus almost exclusively and in greater depth on those areas of science relating to human health with some basic chemistry and physics – the biggest of the ’big ideas’. With science in Key Stage 4 (age 15-16) reverting back to a more traditional ‘science for the future scientist’ and that studying biology, chemistry and physics at Key Stage 4 would become an option rather than a core requirement. We will also argue that, in a ‘black box’ technological world, individuals can be, and indeed are, very effective users of technology, and the underlying science, without the need
for them to be scientifically literate.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Ian Abrahams, University of Lincoln, School of Education

Beverley Potterton, University of Lincoln, School of Education

Nikolaos Fotou, University of Lincoln, School of Education

Marina Constantinou, University of Lincoln, School of Education


 

Diversity, dialogue, and identity in designing globally relevant social work education

Dr Janet Walker, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Health and Social Care Deputy Head of School Dr Michael Rasell, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Health and Social Care UoL CoSS Research

 

 

 

 

This article reflects on how to design social work education for internationally diverse cohorts of students. It draws on insights from a Master program for social work practitioners from around the world that has been delivered by a partnership of five European universities since 2013. Three particular issues are explored: developing curricula that achieve a local–global balance and emphasise the significance of context sensitivity in social work; the need for teaching approaches that promote dialogue, critical analysis, and student well-being; the importance of providing students with a strong identity, value base, and connection to the global social work profession. The article is targeted at social work educators involved in international and cross-country teaching as well as scholars interested in debates about the balance of local–global dimensions in social work.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Michael Rasell, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Helene Join-Lambert, Universite Paris Nanterre, Department of Educational Sciences

Agnieszka Naumiuk, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Education

Carla Pinto, University of Lisbon, Institute for Social and Political Sciences

Lars Uggerhoj, University of Aalborg, Department of Sociology and Social Work

Janet Walker, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care


 

Is the Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) efficacious for improving personal and clinical recovery outcomes? A systematic review and meta-analysis

The Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) is a structured approach to illness self-management that is widely used within mental health services. This systematic review identifies, appraises, and meta-analyses quantitative evidence from experimental or quasi-experimental comparison group designs for effects of WRAP on measures reflecting personal recovery and clinical symptomatology.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Nima Moghaddam, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology


 

CaHRU at Trent Regional SAPC, Nottingham, March 2019

CaHRU, Community and Health Research Unit

CaHRU was well represented at the recent annual Trent Regional SAPC Conference which this year was held at East Midlands Conference Centre, Nottingham on 19 March 2019 .

The core of the morning session were the two parallel sessions. Dr Zahid Asghar presented his work on the performance of candidates with dyslexia in the MRCGP clinical skills assessment. In the second of the parallel sessions, Dr Julie Pattinson presented her work on a process evaluation in Sleep Restriction Therapy. Viet-Hai Phung did an oral presentation of a poster of CaHRU’s study on diabetes-related emergencies in care homes. Despina Laparidou displayed a poster showcasing her work on systematic review on insomnia in patients with tinnitus.

While there was a significant presence from CaHRU, there were other interesting presentations in the morning and afternoon. Professor Paul Crawford from the University of Nottingham discussed the relatively new field of health humanities. He talked about the potential for the humanities to play a more influential role in informing healthcare. There is a lot more work to be done in respect of this, but it was certainly innovative.

In the afternoon, Dr Helen Garr took time out from being a GP at Cripps Practice at the University of Nottingham to talk about the importance of balancing work and well-being. She used anecdotes from a compelling backstory to provide some context for her interest in this area. It was very evident that Dr Garr was very fond of visuals and audio in her presentation. Not many speakers get their audience up and dancing to Wake Me Up Before You Go Go but she managed it!


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Zahid Asghar, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Dr Julie Pattinson, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Mr Viet-Hai Phung, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Ms Despina Laparidou, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Prof Paul Crawford, University of Nottingham

Dr Helen Garr, Cripps Practice, University of Nottingham


 

Prevalence of clinical autistic traits within a homeless population: barriers to accessing homeless services

Dr Niko Kargas, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of PsychologyDr Amanda Roberts, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology

 

 

 

 

 

Recent research suggests a high prevalence rate of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC) amongst the homeless population. Although, it is well-documented that autistic people experienced many barriers to accessing health services, little is known about their challenges in accessing homeless services. Thus, the present study aimed to measure prevalence of high levels of autistic traits, and to identify barriers that prevent autistic people accessing homeless services. Participants recruited from homeless services (n = 65) completed the Autism Quotient-10 (AQ-10) alongside a questionnaire regarding perceived accessibility of homeless services. Results revealed that 18.5% of participants scored Above the Clinical Threshold of the AQ-10 (ACT-AQ). Moreover, the ACT-AQ group reported that encountering big groups in shared accommodation represent a significant barrier to engaging with homeless services. Further research is needed to identify the full degree of ASC representation and the factors that might prevent autistic homeless people accessing homeless services, and thus overcoming homelessness.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Niko Kargas, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology and Autism Research Innovation Centre

Kathryn Harley, University of Lincoln, Autism Research Innovation Centre

Amanda Roberts, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology and Autism Research Innovation Centre

Stephen Sharman, University of Lincoln, Autism Research Innovation Centre