Competitive Swimming

Health Advancement Research Team, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Gareth McNarry, a HART PhD student undertaking a dual doctorate with the University of Lincoln and the University of Copenhagen, has recently had published, as lead author, an article on the importance of reflexivity and bracketing in sociological/phenomenological research. In the article, Gareth and his co-authors and supervisors, Prof Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson and Dr Adam Evans(Copenhagen), address the ‘thorny issue’ of epochē/bracketing when undertaking ethnographic ‘insider’ research.

The paper portrays some of the key challenges encountered by Gareth when researching a group of competitive swimmers, particularly given that he was highly familiar with the world of competitive swimming, having been both a competitive swimmer and swimming coach. The article concludes by suggesting some practical ways in which researchers in sport and physical cultures might approach bracketing in ethnographic ‘insider’ research. The article is published (2019) in the international journal, Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise & Health: 

McNarry, G, Allen-Collinson, J, Evans, A B (2019) Reflexivity and bracketing in sociological phenomenological research: researching the competitive swimming lifeworld, Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Mr Gareth McNarry, University of Copenhagen and University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Prof Jacquelyn Allen- Collinson, University of Lincoln, School of Sport and Exercise Science

Dr Adam Evans, University of Copenhagen


 

Living in Harmony with Nature? A Critical Appraisal of the Rights of Mother Earth in Bolivia

Juridical protection of the rights of nature is steadily emerging in several legal systems and in public discourse. Building on a recent publication in Transnational Environmental Law in which we interrogated Ecuador’s constitutional experiment with the rights of nature, we critically reflect in this contribution on Bolivia’s legal regime providing for the rights of Mother Earth. We do so, first, by sketching the juridical-political context within which these statutes were drafted and adopted, and then by analysing the relevant constitutional provisions that provide the basis for the laws of Mother Earth. The third part forms the bulk of the discussion and details the background and the most relevant provisions of Bolivian statutes with a view to enabling a deeper critique in Part 4, in which we critically evaluate both the symbolic and the theoretical significance of the statutes as well as concerns related to their practical implementation. Insofar as the rights of nature paradigm has now become a truly global debate and a consideration in transnational comparative legal borrowing practices, our analysis aims to reveal the Bolivian experience, which could be instructive for civil society groups, academics, politicians and legislatures in a transnational setting.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Prof Louis Kotze, North-West University (South Africa) and University of Lincoln, Lincoln Law School

Paola Villavicencio Calzadilla, North-West University (South Africa) and University of Groningen (Netherlands)


 

Independent Health Needs Assessment for People Living with Neurological Conditions

Healthy Ageing Research Group, HARG, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science ,School of Health and Social Care

HARG were asked by Lincolnshire County Council to undertake an independent health needs assessment for people living with neurological conditions in the county. A health needs assessment is a way in reviewing the current resources available to meeting the needs of a specific population. The review looked at adults over the age of 18, and young adults moving into adult services. It covered a range of neurological conditions, including stroke, epilepsy, Parkinson’s and multiple sclerosis, among others. Lincolnshire County Council had previously undertaken a separate review looking at the needs of people with dementia, so dementia was not included within this study.

The aim of this report was to:

  • Establish how many people in Lincolnshire are affected by neurological conditions, and how this compares with other parts of the UK;
  • Review what we already know about the needs of people with neurological conditions;
  • Explore what current services exist to meet the needs of people with neurological conditions;
  • Understand the views of service users, their carers, voluntary groups and healthcare professionals on neurological services;
  • Identify examples of good practice in services, but also see if any needs were not being met;
  • Make recommendations to those who plan and deliver healthcare locally.

 

 


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Prof Mo Ray, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Dr Kelly Sisson, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Thomas George, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care

Emily Scott, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care


 

 

Research by Professor Steve McKay Featured in Article About Mental Health in Children

Prof Steve McKay, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Social and Political Science

Boys who have a close relationship with their mothers at 14 are 41 per cent less likely to have mental health problems and girls who are close to their fathers are 44 per cent less likely to suffer emotional problems or have trouble with their peers, the research found. Professor Steve McKay from Lincoln School of Social and Political Sciences co-authored the study with Harry Benson, research director of the Marriage Foundation.

The analysis, which uses Millennium Cohort Study data from 11,000 mothers, found that the biggest factor affecting teenage mental health was family breakdown.

The study finds that boys and girls are especially influenced by their relationship with the opposite sex parent.

‘Boys who are close to their mum tend to have better mental health, as do girls who are close to their dad. The fact that these links only apply to one parent and not both suggests that it’s the closeness with parents that affects the child’s mental health and not the other way around.’

In addition, boys are affected by whether their parents are married and happy whereas girls are more affected by whether their parents have avoided physical force, poor quality relationship, or low income. So boys seem to be looking for signs of clarity whereas girls are looking for anything that might make relationships difficult. A strong relationship with the parent of the opposite sex boosts self-esteem.

‘We think this is the first study to connect how the relationships that children experience at home are setting them up for their own future relationships as adults.’


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Prof Steve McKay, University of Lincoln, School of Social and Political Sciences