Lincoln Psychology Introduce New Computer Game For Children With Vision Loss

Researchers from the University of Lincoln have teamed up with the WESC Foundation to create a new browser-based game called Eyelander, which aims to help children and young people with vision-loss to lead more independent lives.

The game was specifically designed for people with visual field loss caused by Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI) – which is usually the result of a brain injury – and it prompts the player to use their vision more efficiently. The game requires players to move their eyes quickly around the screen to find matching shapes and colours at different positions and it is punctuated with encouraging words to motivate the player.

When played regularly the game can improve people’s performance of everyday tasks such as navigating through a crowded space or reaching for items in a supermarket.

College of Social Science Showcase 2018

Welcome to the annual College of Social Science Showcase programme. This is a real celebration of some of our research ad enterprise successes over the past year and includes presentations from relatively new, the more seasoned and also our very experienced researchers and academics. The staff presenting have been carefully selected so I am anticipating a lively and varied event, which reflects the diverse range of disciplines sitting under the broad umbrella of Social Science. Come prepared to ask questions, engage in the debates, discover what research your colleagues are engaged in and make the most of the networking opportunities. I’ll look forward to catching up with you over the course of the day.

 

– Sara Owen

Autism Research and Innovation Centre (A.R.I.C)

Dr Niko Kargas, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology, Director of Autism Research and Innovation Centre (ARIC)

The ARIC is a multi-disciplinary research centre that delivers real world research grounded in the needs of people on the autism spectrum, their families and the professionals that support them.

The Mission

The mission of the ARIC is to create a diverse and inclusive environment where community knowledge and academic expertise merge and complement each other in productive and impactful ways. The centre studies and develops evidence-based innovative approaches that are used by professionals across education, business, health and social services with the aim of enriching the lives of autistic people and their families.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Niko Kargas, School of Psychology, Director of the Autism Research & Innovation Centre (ARIC)


Lucid Dreaming: large data base analysis.

Dr Patrick Bourke, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology

Lucid Dreaming is where, while dreaming people become aware that their current experience is in fact a dream. Support was sought to employ a research assistant to initiate the analyses of a pre-existing data-set of thousands of dream reports. Fundamental statistics were extracted e.g. on the time required to acquire lucidity, age, gender. The words used in describing lucid and non-lucid dreams were compared. The possibility was explored of using automatic text recognition software to extract key features of lucid dreams.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Patrick Bourke, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology


 

Better Health Care for Offenders

Dr Coral Sirdifield, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Health and Social Care

There are over 200,000 offenders on probation in the UK. People in this group are often deprived, vulnerable and have more health needs (e.g. mental health, drug and alcohol problems) compared to the general population.

Many offenders are not registered with a GP, and/or only access healthcare during crises. To reduce health inequalities, we first need to understand how healthcare is provided to offenders, and how its quality can be measured and improved.

This is important because providing better, evidence-based healthcare will improve offenders’ health, increase their chances of completing probation, and reduce their risk of re-offending, with potential cost savings to the NHS from less unnecessary use of urgent and emergency services.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Coral Sirdifield, University of Lincoln, School of Health and Social Care


 

Visual Awareness of Familiar Faces

Dr Kay Ritchie, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology

We know from a large body of research that there are differences between the ways familiar and unfamiliar faces are processed in the brain. To date, however, there has been only a limited exploration of how the high-level concept of our familiarity with a person may influence low-level processes such as visual awareness. This study compared visual awareness for familiar and unfamiliar faces in two experiments.


Univeristy of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Kay Ritchie, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology


Men, Poverty and Lifetimes of Care

Dr Anna Tarrant, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science School of Social and Political Sciences

Anxieties about father absence and the so-called ‘crisis of fatherlessness’ appear to have taken on a renewed significance and sway in the post-2008 recession and austerity contexts. Such anxieties typically implicate working-class men, perpetuating stereotypes that they are most likely to be uncaring, feckless and indifferent to family life. As with other accounts of low-income life, these representations have become widespread and ‘‘overburdened’ with powerful and unspoken assumptions’ (MacDonald, 2008, 236), yet they are often underpinned by limited or problematic interpretations of evidence.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Anna Tarrant, University of Lincoln, School of Social and Political Sciences


 

Assessment Companion for Thinking Skills (ACTS)

Dr Anita Backhouse, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Education

Erasmus+ is a European Union initiative that aims to modernise education, training and youth work across Europe. A bid for a three year project that focuses on the development of critical thinking skills through innovative approaches and the exchange of good practices was submitted to Erasmus+ by the University of Lincoln in March 2017. The bid for the strategic partnership project was successful and the University and its partners were awarded €390,068 in September 2017.

The Assessment Companion for Thinking Skills (ACTS) Project is a partnership between seven institutions in the UK, Latvia and Finland.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Anita Backhouse, University of Lincoln, School of Education


 

Migraine and the Motion Streak

Dr Louise O'Hare, University of Lincoln, College of Social Science, School of Psychology

Migraine is a common and debilitating neurological disorder, affecting around 13% of adults (steiner et al., 2003) and is among the ten most debilitating disorders according to the World Health Organisation (stovener et al., 2007). The causes of the disorder are unknown, and current therapies available are commonly drugs, whose mode of action for alleviating migraine is also unclear. Investigating the mechanisms of migraines will help the development of alternative therapies.


University of Lincoln, College of Social Science Research

Dr Louise O’Hare, University of Lincoln, School of Psychology